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Unfilled Tech Jobs and Their Cost to the U.S.

It's no secret that there are millions of job openings in the U.S. today, but have you ever wondered how much they're worth?

Unfilled Tech Jobs and Their Cost to the U.S.

Glassdoor analyzed salary data and real-time job listings to determine the value of unfilled jobs by industry and geography. There are approximately 5.1 million job listings on Glassdoor today and their total value is about $272.6 billion.

When you look at Information Technology alone, there are an estimated 263,586 unfilled IT jobs posted by employers in the U.S., adding up to $20.9 billion. IT is #5 on the list of industries with the highest unfilled job value with Healthcare at #1 with 797,036 jobs worth $45.1 billion.

Here are the top 10 unfilled tech jobs with the highest economic value:

  1. Software engineer
    Open jobs: 13,198
    Average base pay: $98,263
    Economic value: $1,296,871,985
  2. Systems engineer
    Open jobs: 6,769
    Average base pay: $89,588
    Economic value: $606,424,461
  3. Product manager
    Open jobs: 3,874
    Average base pay: $104,274
    Economic value: $403,956,437
  4. Data scientist
    Open jobs: 3,508
    Average base pay: $114,035
    Economic value: $400,033,101
  5. Network engineer
    Open jobs: 3,882
    Average base pay: $83,873
    Economic value: $325,594,753
  6. Data engineer
    Open jobs: 3,073
    Average base pay: $104,551
    Economic value: $321,286,159
  7. Java developer
    Open jobs: 3,784
    Average base pay: $83,009
    Economic value: $314,104,895
  8. Software development engineer in test
    Open jobs: 3,573
    Average base pay: $86,553
    Economic value: $309,254,859
  9. Front end engineer
    Open jobs: 2,948
    Average base pay: $90,676
    Economic value: $267,314,264
  10. Security engineer
    Open jobs: 2,225
    Average base pay: $103,000
    Economic value: $229,175,745

"Filling open jobs doesn't just help workers. It also helps companies and the broader economy. Every job that's open is money left on the table, in the form of lost productivity for employers and earnings in consumers' pockets. When more open jobs are filled with the right people, economic gains include greater business productivity and consumer spending, thanks to more people earning wages, then saving, investing and spending those wages," says Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at Glassdoor.

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